Get Involved – CDM Media EMEA Events

As we approach the start of Q4, CDM Media will be hosting a lineup of fantastic EMEA summits for attendees to take advantage of before the end of the year. We are bringing some of the top C-level executives in IT and security to discuss the industry’s current trends and challenges. The topics that will be discussed include digital transformation, AI, IoT, GDPR, blockchain, robotic process automation (RPA), and many more.

Attendees are provided the unique opportunity to collaborate with likeminded C-suite thought-leaders to benchmark, knowledge-share and network. Closed-door and peer-led, CDM Media summits are the ideal environment for rich content and collaboration.

Remaining 2017 EMEA events:

Grow your network and knowledge now by getting in touch with Matt Rymon – matt.rymon@cdmmedia.com

Julia Davis to Keynote CIO Insurance Summit

CIO of Aflac to Lead as Keynote Presenter on “Bridging Gaps Through Trimodal IT”

julia-davis-aflacWe are pleased to announce Julia Davis, CIO, Aflac, as a keynote speaker for the CIO Insurance Summit from November 8 – November 10, 2016. The event will take place at the Hotel Palomar in Phoenix, AZ alongside CIO Insurance Summit and CISO BFSI Summit.

Julia Davis joined Aflac in July 2013 in her current position as senior vice president and chief information officer. In her position, Davis oversees the day-to-day operations and the strategic initiatives of Aflacs Information Technology Division.

Before joining Aflac, Davis most recently served as chief information officer at American Safety Insurance (ASI). Prior to her tenure at ASI, she served as chief information officer of the Equipment Finance Division for GE Capital Healthcare Financial Services and GE Capital Business Productivity Solutions. Additionally, she held IT leadership positions at GE Energy, Armstrong World Industries, Information Builders, Ogden Government Services and CRSS Services, Inc.

Her keynote presentation will cover “Bridging Gaps Through Trimodal IT”. Takeaways will include:

  • Blend bimodal and trimodal IT to find a model that fits your company’s culture and needs.
  • Tackle projects in segments and demonstrate incremental change and success with each successive step.
  • Adopt a big picture approach and allocate resources such as funding across a project’s entire lifecycle instead of on an annual basis.

To learn more about the event and register today visit:

CIO Summit US: http://www.cioinsurancesummit.com/

To view all of our upcoming events, visit CDM Media’s Summit Calendar.

The Media is Talking About: Internet of Things in Financial Services

CDM Media’s Senior Director of Content & C-Suite Communities, James Quin is regularly cited in various media stories across a variety of industries. But leading up to these article inclusions are many conversations and insightful commentaries which don’t always make the publication. In this weekly (or more!) new section, James shares his responses to a myriad of tech topics he discusses with journalists. 

The Media is Talking About- -Internet of Things in Financial Services-

The Internet of Things has been impacting a variety of industries. At the end of the day, it’s all data and the key is, where is that data going and how is it being used?

The Internet of Things is certainly something that gets a lot of hype these days, but we’re still pretty early on the hype cycle to be honest – Banks and other financial services businesses are kicking the tires. In a lot of cases, the point of IoT type technologies is to stream data directly to intelligent systems that can aggregate, collate, and act upon the information independent of human interaction, or at the very least with minimal human interaction. Banks are, so far, finding the best use and impact of IoT to be on call centers and call center agents to be a net positive. While more data will be coming to the company, the systems that it comes to will handle at least first level processing of the data, lessening the workload on the people in the equation.

To learn more or attend one of our CIO Summits, visit http://www.ciosummits.com/

 

 

The Media is Talking About: Dead/ Dying Technologies

CDM Media’s Senior Director of Content & C-Suite Communities, James Quin is regularly cited in various media stories across a variety of industries. But leading up to these article inclusions are many conversations and insightful commentaries which don’t always make the publication. In this weekly (or more!) new section, James shares his responses to a myriad of tech topics he discusses with journalists. technologic

When we think about “dead technology,” things like the typewriter and VHS players come to mind. But what should we be getting ready to put out to the curb in the near future?  James Quin weighs-in:

Interesting topic. In regards to the first part of the question, what has replaced what, I think we can boil it down to “more flexible devices and replaced less flexible devices”. Film cameras were replaced by digital cameras not because they were worse cameras (early digital cameras were punishingly expensive with tiny resolutions) but because digital cameras offered greater flexibility – you could shoot more and see what you’d shot instantly.

Landline phones have been replaced by cell phones for the same reasons – even though the devices and the service plans are significantly more expensive, mobile phones allow us to always be available where landlines limited that availability to the proximity of the phone. This isn’t a new phenomenon – cars replaced horse and carriage because they offered greater flexibility, email replaced faxes which replaced telexes which replaced telegrams which replaced letters as the primary means of written communication because each offered more flexibility and capability than the former.

In regards to what’s up next for replacement, I think the technology area under the most threat is traditional personal computing infrastructure in all its various forms and factors. For a long time mobile devices have been making huge inroads into the marketplace for more traditional personal computers (desktops and laptops) with the only thing holding them back being the ability to create and manipulate large amounts of data and/or complex documents. However as mobile devices become more powerful and new input and output mechanisms come to the fore (think things like the Oculus Rift and over VR technologies) the need to work via traditional computers will be minimized.

I can easily foresee a time when mobile devices become powerful enough to be portable computing hubs, that we’ll access their storage and processing capacity via a variety of wirelessly connected input and output devices that will obviate the constraints of the mobile device form factor.

To learn more or attend one of our CIO Summits, visit http://www.ciosummits.com/

Successful CIO Healthcare Summit!

The team returned to Honolulu this week from a successful CIO Healthcare Summit in Scottsdale, Arizona, and we’d like to extend a special thank you to all of the delegates and sponsors who participated in the event!

Pictures of the event can be found on our  Flickr page: http://www.flickr.com/photos/cdmmediaevents/

Highlights from this year’s agenda included: 

  • Dr. Charles Kennedy’s, VP Health IT, Wellpoint, National Health IT Policy Committee,keynote on the HITECH Act
  • The CIO Executive Visions Panels on improving patient care, moderated by Jack Santos, CIO Executive Strategist, Burton Group 
  • Steve Aylward’s, GM, Health & Life Sciences, Microsoft, presentation on solutions and technologies that enable better care and outcomes

The CIO Executive Think-tank sessions, which were new to this year’s summit agenda, allowed executives to have candid conversations  in a roundtable, sponsor-free environment. With no pre-determined discussion topics, executives were able to guide the conversation around the issues that were most important to them and their organizations. 

The next CIO Healthcare Summit will be held December 12-15, 2010. If you’re interested in participating in the event, please contact Nick Backhouse, Event Director, CIO Healthcare Summit at 808-694-3600 or nick.backhouse@cdmmedia.com.

6 Event Marketing Tips

As I mentioned in a previous post, more C-level executives are participating in industry events, including CIOs. This begs the question, how can I make sure that my company or products stand out from the crowd? Here’s a few ideas to get you started:

  • If you have time, read the latest industry news on the morning of the event. It will provide you with good icebreakers to use throughout the day. This article from the Harvard Business Review provides great tips on how to break into a group conversation gracefully. 
  • Write and practice targeted elevator speeches so that you can quickly and easily sum up your company’s products in 30 seconds or less. Targeted speeches ensure that you are addressing each individual’s interests.
  • Stand out—in a tasteful, professional way. Wear something brightly colored, give compliments or perform a kind gesture. That way, when you connect with attendees outside of the event, they’ll be more apt to remember you and, perhaps, more open to having a conversation.
  • Make sure the giveaways you hand out at the event speak to your audience. If you’re targeting nurses, print your company’s name on a watch or shoe inserts. Give universal charging hubs to technology professionals. While branded pens and stationary are useful and safe choice, sometimes it’s better to be unique.
  • If you connected well with a potential buyer, consider sending them a hand written note instead of an email. Send it out on the last day of the event so it’s waiting on his/her desk when he/she returns to the office.
  • If you’re involved in social media, connect with the individuals you meet within a few days of the event. This opens up another channel of communication.

What event marketing techniques do you use? Share them below!

Allow me to introduce the CIO Content Development Committee!

For this year’s CIO Finance Summit, CDM Media pulled together some of the most engaging and innovative CIOs and IT executives from the finance industry to form the CIO Content Development Committee. This year’s committee members include:

  • Harvey Koeppel, Executive Director, Center for CIO Leadership, CIO Finance Summit Master of Ceremonies and CIO Content Development Committee Chairman
  • Duane Good, EVP, Head of Risk Systems Infrastructure, HSBC North America
  • Sudhir Nair, SVP, Business Technology, Bank of America
  • H.P. Bunaes, SVP, Director, Risk Management Information and Technology, Sun Trust Bank
  • Paul Jameson, Global Director for Financial Industry, Cisco Systems

The CIO Content Development Committee plays a critical role in determining the topics that are discussed at the CIO Finance Summit. An end-user driven agenda ensures that all CIO and technology executive attendees will get critical information from the event’s panel discussions, workshops, and case studies.

So, a big welcome and thank you to all of this year’s CIO Finance Summit Content Development Committee members. We’re looking forward to a great event!

For more information about the technology event, go to the CIO Finance Summit site.

For more information about the committee, check out the CIO Content Development Committee flyer or the latest press release.

C-level Executives Participating in More Industry Events

According to a recent Weber Shandwick study, “CEO participation at top-tier events nearly doubled since 2007.” Participation by CIOs and other C-level executives increased 40 percent since the same year.

The study looked at the number of CEO and C-suite participants from the top 50 most admired companies, as named by Fortune, at 22 conferences.

While this increase was mainly attributed to CEOs from the financial sector, it is still telling that, even during an economic downturn, executives are making a point to distribute content, give presentations and network with their peers. In other words, they are working to keep their company visible among their colleagues.

In addition, executives are also becoming more visible to the public via social networking sites. According to a recent NFI Research study, executives are embracing LinkedIn, blogs and Facebook for business purposes. In fact, 86 percent of surveyed executives from large companies were utilizing LinkedIn.

As we enter into 2010, one can only assume that this trend towards increased visibility will continue as markets are tighter and more competitive, and there is less money to go around. 

What events will you be participating in during 2010?

CDM Media's 2010 Event Schedule

Clear your calendars…announcing CDM Media’s 2010 event schedule:

 CIO Utilities Summit—April 18-21

CIO Healthcare Summit—May 9-12

CIO Government Summit—May 23-26

CIO Finance Summit—August 29-September 1

CIO Summit—September 19-22

CTO Telecom Summit—October 3-6

CIO Insurance Summit—October 17-20

CIO Education Summit—November 7-10

Information on becoming a summit delegate can be found on each event’s site. 

If you’re interested in sponsoring a CDM Media event, check out the CIO Summits site for more information. 

And a big thank you to all of the delegates and sponsors who made CDM Media’s 2009 events a huge success! We look forward to working with you in 2010.

Interview with Srini Koushik, SVP and CTO, Nationwide Insurance

Earlier this week, Glenn Willis, Editor-in-Chief of ITO America and CEO of CDM Media, interviewed Srini Koushik, SVP and CTO of Nationwide Insurance. Srini discussed the Nationwide Development Center, an innovative project that will eliminate the company’s need to outsource application development, while improving the IT experience for associates and customers. Below is the transcribed interview. To listen to the podcast, click here.

This interview was part of ITO America’s Thought-leadership Series, an ongoing project that features one-on-one interviews with innovative thinkers from top companies in North America. If you would like to be considered as a participant, please leave a comment with your contact information. 

What exactly is the Nationwide Development Center?

The Nationwide Development Center is a pretty unique concept. Nationwide spends roughly $200 million on application development and maintenance every year. These applications are undergoing significant modifications. The traditional way of looking at application development with the skill shortage we’ve got in the United States has been to go out and do massive outsourcing. A lot of my peers have done that and they’ve had different levels of success with it. What we decided to do is to take a different approach to it. We wanted to set this up, given the fact that we are going to have this level of demand coming at us. The problem we were trying to solve was, can we actually get to be very good at this? In order to do that we had to make sure that we put the right tools and processes and technologies in place for us to be able to both improve the productivity of our associates and increase the recruitment rate. And one of the things you get out of it is a very high level of quality. So our eventual objective with the Nationwide Development Center is to actually prove that we can deliver the same if not better proposition then taking all of this stuff and outsourcing it to India, China or any other place.

What was the catalyst behind the creation of the Development Center and what issues did the company face that the Development Center will address?

You talked about Nationwide’s growth in your introduction. With that growth comes increased expectations. Increased expectations of being able to not just be a follower on technology and IT, but actually be a leader in that space. So the demands for our business partners became tougher and tougher. They wanted things better, faster, cheaper. You know that cycle never ends. It’s a continuous cycle of trying to get better and if you get there, hoping I do that faster and at a price that is economical. So the external pressure that we were getting not only to keep pace with the industry, but also to stay ahead of it, was one of the driving factors behind the Development Center. What I’ve just outlined for you is not different than a CIO in any growing company is going to face. But, as I pointed out earlier, the standard approach that a lot of IT leaders use is to find the skills where you can. That’s led to increased outsourcing of work and that’s actually a very viable alternative. The challenge becomes the increased management overhead that you get managing 24/7 development in a foreign country. What many people find out when they get into that model is that even though they are able to meet the demands of the customers, the business case and the factors that the business case was built upon don’t typically hold together. We looked at that model. We spent some time talking to some of our peers in the industry and said we’ve got to solve this differently. Is there a different way for us to solve this without just throwing more and more armies of people at it? And, as we looked at it, one of the things that’s evolved at a very high pace in the past few years is the application development environments and the tools and techniques that are available today to make application development more efficient. So, all of these things were coming together. I’m lucky to work at a company where IT is actually viewed as a competitive of advantage. We’re not viewed as a cost center. The company recognizes that in order to be successful out there, we have to be good at IT. And in order to do that, they look to IT to come up with new ways to solve it. So when you put all of these things together, we had to come up with a different way to solve this problem and we started the Development Center as a pilot in 2008. We started to build upon it and, in a six-month time frame, we were able to prove out the value proposition so where we are is the build out of it. We are in phase two, growing the development center and taking on the $200 million in application development. 

So it’s a fairly large plan across the board. How much did it cost you to create the Development Center and what ROI are you expecting?

I’m going to give you very high numbers. We have a pretty detailed business case. If you think about today, we run about $40 million of application development through the Development Center. We’ve taken a look at how we executed these projects over the last few years and it was very clear that about 15 percent of that was spent on what we would call waste. So one of the underlying tenants of the Development Center is lean management. The Toyota production system and applying lean management and lean software techniques to application development. Lean management is built on eliminating waste. Whether it’s identifying the different types of waste in software development, but also focusing on what waste is necessary waste. Necessary waste being what you have to do to be able to continue to deliver value to the customer and the unnecessary waste which is the wait times, the increased number of defects, those types of things. So 15 to 20 percent of the application development budget was going into these areas that we would consider waste. So that was one problem. Second, since most of our employees were working on supporting existing systems, a lot of these new development projects that we we’re doing–and we’re working in some very cutting edge technologies and we’re proud of that fact–in order to get it done, the way we used to do it was to work with some of our partners. The very cynical associate would look at this and say, “Well, you’re spending all of that money to train your contractors and suppliers so the knowledge leaves once the project is done.” And there’s a certain element of truth to that. There was enough waste built into our application development process. From 2008 to the end of this year, we will have put in roughly about $3.5 million into the Development Center and we’ve got more planned for next year. So if you think through that, I gave you some very high numbers earlier–$200 million–15 to 20 percent was what we were hoping to save. $3.5 million is paid back very, very quickly. And that was the business proposition. The key was to convince the executive management and the business partners that this was a good use because these are funds that are taken away from some other project. And to make that happen, a big component was that the business was comfortable with IT and how we were delivering that. We have a very solid business partnership at Nationwide and all the way up to our CEO have been involved and very supportive of the Development Center. So that’s made it easier for us to go down this path.

How do you expect the company to benefit from the Development Center in the future?

We’re not different from any other company out there. Our ideas are far greater than our ability to execute. We have some really good ideas to penetrate the marketplace and gain market share. But if the engine that delivers these ideas, IT, is not efficient or not productive enough things have to wait. I think the longer-term benefit is that when you get this thing cranking and moving at the right type of pace for the entire portfolio, we’ll be able to get to some of these ideas way sooner than what’s planned today and that means a lot. People tend to focus on IT innovation in this space. If we go out and create a new mobile application for the iPhone, which we’ve done, you get an advantage, you get the buzz from the marketing and you get maybe two or three months in the marketplace and then there’s some of our competitors that are going to do you one up and then it becomes a race of trying to catch up. The point being is that IT innovation or specific IT related improvements are short lived. Some of the ideas on the backlog are business model innovations that if we are able to get done and put in place, we get a year or two year type of advantage in this marketplace and that’s big for our business. I’m looking forward to the day when we get the Development Center cranking and working and we are able to T up a lot of these ideas. And not everyone of these ideas are going to work, but if we can actually provide the capability to do the fast trial and deliver things with a very high level of quality in a predictable way, that will benefit the business big time. We’re not there yet, but that’s our goal.

What benefits are the customers going to experience?

First of all, when you think about financial services today the amount of features and functions that are now considered to be the bare minimum keeps going up all of the time. Three years ago getting an electronic bill was considered unique. Today it’s almost cost of entry. So as expectations from our customers keep going up, when we don’t deliver to those expectations, we don’t show up in their consideration set. I think one of the things customers get out of it is that the company that they are working with, Nationwide in this case, is able to constantly provide them with best of breed capabilities. So that’s one big thing that they do get. The second is that every software development organization has a certain level of defeats that make it into production. It doesn’t matter if it’s Microsoft or Oracle or any of the big guys. We as an IT organization have defeats that could make its way into the process and that could affect customer experience. The fact that we can deliver better quality code coming out of this is going to be something that a customer can directly see. The third one ends up being that, at the end of the day, cost and prices is very important and as we improve efficiency and productivity the cost of building out this incremental feature-function capability is going to go down and that literally has to get passed on to the customer these days. Again, in the insurance business, it is price competitive. This is a way for us to be able to stay there and keep providing better prices for our customers.

What is your advice to a CIO or CTO that is perhaps thinking about opening a Development Center and how do they get started?

I think if you’re a mid-size insurance company, a lot of the concepts that I’ve talked about still apply. I do understand that the ability to invest at this level may not be there, but there are ways in which you could take advantage of this. One of the things that the state of the economy provides us is that there are large software development companies that are opening up onshore centers. One of the things they could do is to partner with one of these companies to be able to both share in the investment, but at the same time try to leverage some of the advantages that I’ve been talking about. I think that’s one thing that they can definitely do. They can start working with some of these guys who are establishing local presence. And I keep insisting on that local presence because the knowledge transfer component of this thing is really important. Any financial services company will eventually come to the realization that technology and IT are at the core of their business. Unlike a manufacturing company, say an auto manufacturer, they make cars and IT tends to be a support function. In the financial services, what you sell is information. You sell data. You sell a promise. So any insurance company in this marketplace really has to have IT as a core capability and if you get to that point than you are committed to building a big chunk of that capability—maybe not 100 percent—within your organization. As you commit to do that, you have opportunities to work with individual teams. The other thing about the Development Center is that almost half of the projects that go through the Development Center are very small, quick turnaround—two to three month—projects. These are not massive multi-year projects. So, if you think about it from a mid-size insurance company perspective, they tend to see the same type of projects in their portfolio. A lot of the techniques of applying lean management to software development, all of those still apply to any of those companies. I think that there’s a lot to be leveraged from what we’ve done. The challenge will be, what’s the best way for them to sell this concept to their business partners? CIOs and their teams really have to go back and figure out what’s going to work for them.